Visit our web store

We ship anywhere in the world from as little as $2.14 per item!

Workshop R&D

What are we working on at the moment? Step inside to take a look!

Read More

New Releases

Our latest offerings, straight off the laser bed

Read More

container-1a

The core of our shipping container range is this – a container made from 3 layers of heavy card. It is 44mm high and so perfect for blocking line of sight to all infantry models in the various 28/30mm scale ranges.

container-1c

container-strength02

container-strength01

The card is strong on its own but when layered like this, it is extremely robust and durable.

The basic container is sold in packs of three, a very economical way to build up your collection.

But there is a lot more to the range than this. Containers are often converted to other uses once their working life is over, becoming offices, shops and houses.

See this in the store: http://www.lasercutcard.co.za/shop/scenery/shipping_containers/shipping-container-44mm

Container site office set

container-siteoffice-set-b

 

Here, a container has been converted into an office with lots of large windows and a sliding door. There is roof access via a trapdoor and stepladdercontainer-siteoffice-1a

The site office also comes with an accessory set of stepladders and a walkway

container-accessory-1a

See it in the store: http://www.lasercutcard.co.za/shop/container-site-office

Container shops set

container-retail-set-b

These containers have been converted into shops. What do they serve? That’s up to you. One has a roof area accessible by steps so that patrons can enjoy the sights and sounds. This set comprises two converted containers and an accessory set with steps, tables and palettes.


container-retail-1a

 

Container retail #1 has a short hatch with counter and a door. Maybe it sells food or ammunition?

container-retail-2a

Container retail #2 has a long serving hatch and counter. Access is via the container side. This has always been imagined as a bar. Use the roof foto enjoy your beverage. Drinks are on the house (literally)

container-accessory-2a

The accessory set is great for setting the scene and providing cover.

See it in the store: http://www.lasercutcard.co.za/shop/container-shops

Container houses set

 

container-house-set-b

 

These containers have been converted into living spaces. More windows but smaller than the others (security is always a concern in the container slum city). This set comprises two different container houses and the step accessory set.

container-house-1a

 

Container house #1 has square windows in a cottage frame layout. Just add the bowl of petunias

 

container-house-2a

 

Container house #2 has rounded windows, possibly scavenged from an airliner. Roof access if via a trapdoor and ladder.

See it in the store: http://www.lasercutcard.co.za/shop/container-houses

2 comments on “Shipping Containers”

  1. Pingback: Wednesday Snippets | Tabletop Gaming News

  2. Pingback: Containers for 40K | Orkology

Leave a Reply

containers01
Step 1: The containers each got a base coat of various colours

containers02
Step 2: Each container then got a heavy drybrush of a lighter colour. The white container from step 2 had a few strips of masking tape put over it and oversprayed green

containers03
Step 3: All the containers got a same light drybrush with LIGHT TAN (this unifies them and brings out the details)

containers04
Step 4: A dark brown wash was then applied to the bottom half and the roof tops of all the containers

Leave a Reply

All the parts of the model that are glass are first undercoated MATT WHITE

plateglass01
Step 1: Vague cloud patterns are then sprayed over the white using SKY BLUE

plateglass02
Step 2: The bottom right hand corner of each window is then given a quick light spray using FLAT BLUE on the diagonal

To do this, the easiest way is to cut a small template from heavy paper or cereal box card. Actually, cut several as they get wet fast.

Leave a Reply

All our cyborg models are first undercoated MATT BLACK.

cyborg01
Step 1: The entire model is sprayed BRONZE

cyborg02
Step 2: The edges of the model are then sprayed with COPPER

cyborg03
Step 3: The glyph is painted with BRIGHT GREEN

This is considered finished if the model is dormant, but we can go a few extra steps if we want to make it look active.

cyborg04
Step 4: The glyph is given a light airbrush of BRIGHT GREEN

cyborg05
Step 5: The a smaller coat of LIGHT GREEN is applied just over the glyph channels themselves

cyborg06
Step 6: A thin line of WHITE mixed with LIGHT GREEN is painted into the channels

Leave a Reply

If you have any questions about painting your card models, hopefully this page can answer them.

Articles

Painting Cyborgs
Painting Plate Glass
Painting Shipping Containers

FAQ

Q: Will the card warp when I paint it?
A: Not in our experience. Generally the card is layered and this layering prevents warping

Q: Do I need to seal the card before painting?
A: No. We occasionally undercoat using white or black spray paint but we’ve also brushed paint straight on and never had any problems

Q: Can I use normal paints? What about washes?
A: Although we use an airbrush for the larger models (because it saves time and paint), we generally paint with normal brush and paint. We also do normal washes over the models and they work perfectly.

Q: What about after painting? Should I seal it?
A: This is entirely up to you. We generally give our models a sealer coat of matt varnish out a spray can but this is something we do with all our models: plastic, metal and card. The local game store can be a rough place….

LaserCutCard is a southern hemisphere project log… Steve in Australia, Neal in South Africa.

We both have been gaming since the eighties and over the last few years have started doing a lot of scratch building. The most time-consuming part of this was generally cutting all the pieces and so we independently started making up templates that could be cut by either a laser or a CNC machine.

Over time it occurred to us that other people might like the idea of scratch building their own unique pieces without all the tedium of cutting card or plastic and so we started to convert the stuff we had done already into kit form. This basically is what LaserCutCard is: scratchbuilding with all the hassle removed. Neal started it in October 2012 and Steve came on board in early 2013.

These are coming soon

Frequently Asked Questions

Q: Why do you use cardboard instead of plastic? Surely plastic models are stronger/easier to assemble?
A: Plastic unfortunately melts when cut by a laser and develops a ridge of beading formed by the melt. This is time consuming to clean and destroys any straight lines. Card on the other hand cuts perfectly straight and since there is no melt, has a much higher resolution.

Q: Why card instead of MDF? Everyone else seems to use 3mm MDF
A: The problem with 3mm MDF is that it is 3mm thick and so detail can only be etched into it. Using 1mm card we can build up layers of detail that take drybrushing very well.

Q: Isn’t the card weak? I’m worried about the durability of the products… most papercraft stuff is fragile.
A: “Papercraft” products generally use card that is easy to cut with a knife and which is slightly thicker than normal printing paper. The card we use is 1mm heavy duty construction card which starts out extremely strong. Once it has been built up into layers and glued together, it is as strong as plastic and far stronger than resin. We recommend superglue to glue the pieces together and this soaks into the card making it even stronger.

Q: What’s with the shipping options? Why “units of 300g”? Does this mean that if I order 900g of product it will come in 3 separate packages?
A: Yes it does. Lasercutcard’s shipping rates are so low because the goods are technically classed as “letters / documents” and not “parcels”. However there is a strict volumetric and weight limit on letters and so the postage options reflect keeping the goods within that tolerance.
There is an option to ship as a single parcel but this only becomes cost effective if a) you order more than a kilogram and b) you want tracking.

The cyborg range was what started LaserCutCard in the first place. Our first model (the barricade set) was produced in 2012.

barricade01
The very first model we ever produced was the cyborg barricade set and it is still one of our best sellers.

obelisks01
The next item we added to the range was the obelisk set. Currently these are sold in packs of four although we might change this to packs of two in the near future.

sentinal01
The cyborg sentinal was added to serve as either a generator or a gun platform and was the first model we did to incorporate plastic crystals. One of these models (which are sold as a pack of two) is included with the barricade set above to make a cyborg defense line.

grandobelisk01
After this, we added an enormous Grand Obelisk – by far our tallest kit to date. This kit, more than twice the height of the regular obelisk, is bundled with four of the smaller ones to form a cyborg pylon set.

cyborg-statistomb02

The next kit was the cyborg statis tomb – our first kit to make provisions for magnets. This was our first modular kit…the larger pieces are not glued together and so it can be used in a number of different ways.

 

cyborg-hills03
Our most recent addition to the range is the set of cyborg hills. These were added as the range required a set to block line of sight across the table. We also wanted to be able to offer something that could serve as a landing pad for cyborg craft

All these items can be purchased in the shop here: http://www.lasercutcard.co.za/shop/cyborg

 

LaserCutCard is a southern hemisphere project log… Steve in Australia, Neal in South Africa.

We both have been gaming since the eighties and over the last few years have started doing a lot of scratch building. The most time-consuming part of this was generally cutting all the pieces and so we independently started making up templates that could be cut by either a laser or a CNC machine.

Over time it occurred to us that other people might like the idea of scratch building their own unique pieces without all the tedium of cutting card or plastic and so we started to convert the stuff we had done already into kit form. This basically is what LaserCutCard is: scratchbuilding with all the hassle removed. Neal started it in October 2012 and Steve came on board in early 2013.